This Book is a Camera (really)

Book <--> Camera <--> Book <--> Camera — A dream project turned legit-thing-you-can-buy*! ^ (or make!)

For the past couple of months, I’ve been searching for the right sequence of cuts and folds to turn a piece of paper into a camera. Specifically, I wanted to make a working camera within an educational pop-up book—one that connects the dots between design and science / structure and function. Happy to report: it is finally real! The final book explains—and actively demonstrates—how a structure as humble as a folded piece of paper can tap into the intrinsic properties of light to produce a photograph.

Here is how it works (detailed instructions typed out below.)

 

As far as 1800’s tech goes, pinhole photography is an great example of material acting as more than the sum of its parts. If you’re in the market to be blown away by something you normally ignore: make one over the holiday. You don’t need this book—all that you need is a lightproof box with a hole in the front (mini-hangtag safety pins yield a perfect 0.3–0.4 mm hole) and some light-sensitive material loaded in the back. The results achieved by such humble means is a feat of true cosmic piggybacking—showing that objects we make (even from the most lo-fi materials) can be structured to tap into impressive forces at play in our world.

 

 

 

This is an example of the type of photo it takes. Photo taken with an iPhone versus photo taken with a folded-piece-of-paper-in-a-pop-up book:

iphonevpaper

 

The convex surface of the lens of a normal camera merges light beams from a varying angles to produce focus at the focal point. A lensless camera accepts light through a single hole in a flat plane (from a single angle.) Because of this, there are no mechanics to “focus” a pinhole camera—it is a projection from a single beam, much like a camera obscura. The result is that objects near the camera and objects far away from the camera have the same exact amount of focus. Take this image of a fence, the Williamsburg bridge, and the Empire State Building—which is fuzzy, but each structure has an equal degree of focus:

 

 

To see more results: I’m posting sample photos taken with the cameras with #thisbookisacamera on the social things.

 

The book itself comes with detailed instructions and a starter pack of B/W Ilford photo paper (any 4×5” or smaller light-sensitive material can be used). There is nothing to assemble, but if you want to use it as more than a book, you need to feel alright with the concept of pouring developer into an old takeout food container and sloshing it around in the dark… while counting. Been prototyping this for a while, so this totally sounds like a normal human-in-a-dark-room activity. I tested it for a very long time and now my neighbors are probably questioning my sanity:

prototypetests

 

 

The project was supported in part by the Adobe Creative Residency (and produced in multiples by Structural Graphics).

 

Why it works

The reason why a hole in a lightproof box can perform a function similar to real photographic equipment is due to light’s intrinsic tendencies. Light steadfastly moves in a perfectly straight line. In a normal environment, light beams bounce around ambiently—their cacophony of trajectories eager to fog a piece of photographic paper with a muddy multitude of images.

The chaos wrought by multiple beams became clear here—where I maladroitly forgot to patch a second pinhole I was testing. A double image was produced:

twobeams

The book explains the tendencies of light beams this way:

howitworks

 

 

But… Why?

Why work on some piece of antediluvian technology while sitting in a studio surrounded by high-tech tools like lasers, Graphtec cutters, and Illustrator?

For the past few years, I’ve been trying to better understand forces at play in the analog world through a process of subtraction. To do this, I’ve been disassembling everyday tools, stripping off their normal interface, and reducing them down to their functional minimums.

The value in this eccentric hobby is best illustrated with a past work-example: We frequently take for granted that music occurs because “we pushed play,” but what truly enables sound to reach our ears? In 2011, driven by sheer determination to recreate an experiment from a 1980’s Mr. Wizard episode, I made this paper record player invitation for my friends Mike and Karen’s wedding. Using only humble materials and handmade construction, this “device” corrals minute soundwave vibrations from a needle up into a paper tunnel, which in turn amplifies those waves into audibility. We knew this thing would be super-cool if we got it to work, but even we were surprised by the result. With a gesture, the paper device effectively demystified the exact thing that tech obscures: it syncopates the experience of sound with touch — demonstrating the different sensory ways that vibration manifests itself (a fact that is nevertheless difficult to grasp when stated verbally.) It essentially connected what we had been told was true about sound with what we could actually feel, firsthand.

Thinking with your hands—and showcasing the wonders of the physical world—turns out is addictive. I got hooked on the slow (but varied) thrills of paper engineering. In pockets of time between projects, I’ve devised fifteen functional, but rough prototypes for lo-fi pop-up devices that I hope to one day make real. Six of these contraptions will appear in a forthcoming book, which is being mass-produced by Chronicle. This Book is a Planetarium morphs from being a planetarium, to a spirograph, to a musical instrument, to a perpetual calendar, to a decoder ring, to a speaker. The pop-ups are supported by text connecting the dots between form and the hidden forces at play in the physical world. It will be at Barnes and Noble and Wal-mart and everywhere come Spring.

The remaining nine prototypes were deemed too complex for mass production. However, when the release of This Book is a Planetarium was pushed back*, I was eager to self-publish one of the rejects. This pinhole camera is one of those rejects— refined to stand on its own, but will also enhance the collection when it materializes. That is the plan.

(*I should mention: the planetarium book is still coming! Navigating the mass-production process is far more challenging than working directly with a printer.… but I have faith that it will eventually be great…)

 

 

 

How I’ve been prototyping a book like this

I began by hand cutting-and-folding rough sketches (the 3-D equivalent to napkin doodles), then refining the rough builds in Illustrator, outputting them to a Craft Robo cutter, then tinkering with them further using an x-acto knife. It is always a messy mash-up of analog intuition and digital refinement. Initially, I was convinced that some configuration of nested box shapes would yield a perfectly lightproof space (similar to the light traps one sees in darkroom entryways) — so I looked at (and dissected) many pop-up books involving boxes trying to find a way to implement this plan. (Def. regretted the book dissection, but after speaking with many pop-up experts: all pop-up books have the blood of other pop-up books on their pages.)

The problem with this approach: if you’ve ever peered into a halfway-open pop-up book, you know that many of the “solid” shapes fold flat by opening on at least one side. Pop-up books offer only the illusion of cohesive form. Like an anamorphic drawing, they are whole and complete only from a single vantage point (an open book.) For example, a pop-up cube folds back in two dimensions along score marks that bisect each of its sides. As the bends at those score marks become more pronounced, they raise up to reveal open triangles. This kind of pop-up technique would ruin an undeveloped photographic image, regardless of the amount of nested perpendicular boxes because the action is always syncopated to the opening/closing of the book. (If anyone has found a solution to this particular spatial riddle, I want to know about it and will update this post!)

To achieve a truly lightproof shape, the corners of the box must be scored and bent in addition to its top and sides. The resulting form is a bellows (like an accordion.) Basically: Had I initially looked back to the design of early cameras, I could have saved myself a ton of time. (Noted: history.)

Once I had a rough plan, I began drawing my score/cut lines in Illustrator (arranging them on separate layers so that I can output the score lines with 50% of the force of the cut lines.) This is a prototyping trick taught to me by Jeff Rutzky, who is a bit of a Craft Robo expert.

The funny thing about this line of work is how disappointing the whole process is… until one day, it miraculously isn’t. The only great camera that I made was the last camera. However, I prototyped and destroyed at least 50 of them until I found one that succeeded in accommodating easily-procurable film/paper types, yielded a book-sized book, collapsed to a not-ridiculously fat shape, resembled a camera, produced reasonably sharp photos, and didn’t cost more to produce than a reasonable sales price. None of these things automatically worked — each requirement was its own separate a battle. Once I had the structure determined, I photographed the blank dummy and Photoshopped-on a design.

While researching, a friend recommended looking at Peter Olpe’s hundreds of different pinhole camera designs. The man is simply amazing: he is a Swiss graphic designer who has been crafting unique pinhole cameras for artists for years as a trade for their work. In his book, you witness the enormous effect that small design changes in the morphology of the camera body exert over the resulting image.

 

 

 

Make it yourself

Because of the potential for experimentation here, a DIY hand-assembly version of the dielines is published under a Creative Commons share-alike license. Please feel free to download the cut and fold lines to DIY it, to examine it, rip it apart, or to develop a completely new variation. (Although manufacturing your own version of the book to sell is not-ok.) Note: Use a thin, but truly opaque black paper. The book uses Mohawk Antique Vellum in Black in the lightest text weight, but Neenah’s Classic Crest text (in Black in the lightest text weight), and Curious Skin (in Black in the lightest text weight) also performed well in tests.

Download the template here.

 

 

 

Credits

This project would have been impossible without the support and help of the Creative Residency team at Adobe, the patience of Daniel Dunnam, copy-editing of Charles Purdy, product advice from Rena Tom, Structural Graphics, hotel ice buckets for acting as makeshift development trays, and the ambient generosity of DIY enthusiasts who pour their wisdom into freely-accessible things like the Pinhole Design Calculator. We also set up a paper camera photo booth at Adobe Max and it was super fun and churned out almost 900 GREAT photos. The proof, taken with a paper camera, of course, of my Creative Residency co-conspirators Libby Nicholoau and Becky Simpson Murphy:

Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 10.30.20 AM

 

 

 

How to use it as a camera (detailed instructions)

1.) Open the Book and lock the tabs to open fully

Achieving this specific focal length is important—the tabs also help to keep the book flat, rigid and hold steady.
Be sure to unlock those tabs before closing again! When bent backwards, they lose their functionality.

 

2.) Insert photo paper (or film…any light-sensitive material will do)

Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 11.26.14 AM

 

3.) Shoot a photo by raising the shutter for the desired exposure time.

Exposed photo paper will “keep” for months, so you can store your undeveloped photos in a light-tight envelope and develop them all at once if you want.

Screen Shot 2015-11-24 at 11.26.22 AM

 


4.) Develop your photographic negative.

Be as DIY or as outsourcey as you wanna be. Here is a chart:

 

5.) Invert and correct it!

Analog cameras produce photographic negatives. The crystals in photo paper and film grow darker as they are exposed to light (so the sun will sow up as a black dot.) I’ve found that the easiest way to get from pinhole negative to corrected final photo is to snap the negative (in even lighting) and correct it with the free Photoshop Express app. (It is truly the most nimble way to get an image—been using it to prototype for months now as it is so much faster than scanning when you need a quick image.)

invert

 

Some notes:

notes

(Photography is an endless question-generating machine. Ask questions and I’ll put em in the FAQ below.)

 

 

 

User-submitted FAQ and further resources as they occur to me…

Q: Where do I purchase additional paper film?
A: Ilford’s 3.5 x 5 RC (resin-coated) paper is the easiest to use. However, you can also quarter standard 8×10 darkroom photography paper (in the dark!) or use standard large format sheet film (otherwise known as 4×5 film.)

Q: Does it only take black and white photos?
A: No. You can put any kind of light sensitive material into the camera and get a result! However, color photographs must be processed in the lab, which makes experimenting with exposure times less possible. The lack of immediate feedback from experimentation may yield a lower quality image. (Pinhole cameras are better suited for b/w photography as it enables a more nimble process of shooting, testing, adjusting, and shooting again.)

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

No related posts.

Comments

127 Responses to “This Book is a Camera (really)”
  1. Avi Solomon says:

    Amazing work! Hope you make the rest of the rejected projects – they sound intriguing:)

  2. Mattias says:

    Ooooo, this is absolutely brilliant! I’ve made several pinholecameras and love the technique. And now it seems like you’ve taken it to a new level. Love it!

    I’ve been following your work for some years now and you and your design still makes me smile.

  3. Oh my gosh! This is the absolute best idea ever! Thank you for being so open and sharing your process! Design at its finest! I work in the Interior Design industry, and you just made my day. Can’t wait to purchase and share with people! Thank you!

  4. Anna says:

    Hi, How long would it take for you to ship this to Canada?

    • Kelli says:

      Hiya, it would take probably 5-6 days in the mail. Although I may not mail out until the 7th as there is a backlog of orders. The 12th-14th ish?

  5. Hi, I like this project very much.
    I just want to give a hint, in case you have photopaper left by accident in light, not all is lost.
    You can put it into the camera and can exposure it by photographing the sun for some days. You will have Solarograms this way, without any development.

    Best regards.
    Bernd

    PS: I like your book and recommended it at aphog forum and dslr forum for German pinholers.

  6. Wes says:

    Love the projects you work on, and even more so, the transparency about where these ideas come from and how they end up being actual products. Keep it up!

  7. Michelle Bonfils says:

    Hi,
    Is this suitable as a gift to an 8 year old kid?
    Thanks!
    Michelle

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Michelle,

      As an educational object and book, an 8 year old would have no problem with it. But as a camera, it is very helpful if either the child or the adult helping them has some darkroom experience. There are some basic concepts that get engrained when you take a photo class (like: no light can touch your film) which takes time and practice to become muscle memory. So it may be less of an age thing and more of a “has someone in the family taken a photo class?” thing. The book gives explicit instructions, but is no substitute for having the basics down pat through practice.

      • Michelle Bonfils says:

        Thank you Kelli for your thoughtful reply. Her dad is an amateur photographer who use to develop his own films and pics so it should work.

  8. P says:

    Will it be reusable after using all the photopaper provided in the kit? How can I put the film inside the camera book? How long will it be shipped to Thailand?

    • Kelli says:

      Yes, in the blogpost and in the book itself, I’ve referenced a particular type of photo paper that is the exact right size for the camera. It is Ilford 3.5″ x 5″ RC paper. You may also quarter 8×10 photo paper, but this has to be done in the dark… so it is a little tricky.

      I don’t know how long it takes to ship to Thailand. It is a 7.6oz package in a 10×12 standard sized bubble mailer. It is being shipped from US zip code 11249. If you want to pick a shipping method, I’ll gladly ship it using that service. Just put your info + the above info into a postage calculator and let me know which service that you want and how much it will be. I can send a paypal invoice for actual cost. Thanks again!

      • P says:

        Thank you very much.

        If I order now, could you ship the product right away, or this is the pre-order and I will get the camera book in February?

        • Kelli says:

          Hi P, I’m sorry—the initial printing of the book sold out in like a week. I won’t have more until February, which is why I changed the checkout cart thing to say “preorder.” Really sorry about this!

          Kelli

  9. Stephanie says:

    Hi Kelli !

    This project is amazing !! It looks like so much fun !

    I’d like to give it as a gift for Christmas, but I live in France, so I’m not sure it will be there on time if I order now.

    Can you enlighten me on that matter ?

    Thank you :-)

    • Kelli says:

      Thank you. I am shipping all of the cameras on Dec. 4th and 5th. The post office indicates that there is a 4-10 day shipment time to all locations in the US depending on how far away yo are from NYC (where I am based.) Hope that helps!

  10. Arely Pérez says:

    Hi, i want one of your books camera for a christmas gift. Im from mexico, so would you ship to mexico? If the answer will be yes i´ll be making the payment inmediatly! Hope you can help me!
    And another thing, how many days do the ship take to méxico?

    Thanks! and congratulations for your amazing project.

    • Kelli says:

      Indeed! Just put your address into paypal and it auto-calculates the shipping to Mexico. I’ll send it out on Monday and the post office says that it will take “4-20 days” (apologies about the range.) Because it is the holidays, mail should be faster than usual, so I’d say that yes, it will probably be there before Christmas

  11. Anni says:

    You get my vote for the most creative card of the year – well done!!

  12. Jason says:

    Hello Kelli,

    This is a very unique and awesome idea! I’m glad you were able to pull this off! :)

    I ordered one and I was curious if we would receive any kind of notification when you’ve had the chance to ship these?

    • Kelli says:

      Thanks Jason. It took me by surprise that all of them were claimed so quickly, so it has been a bit of an adventure in shipping supplies over here. But-they will go out the 9th at the latest. Realize it would be very disappointing for many people if they didn’t arrive for xmas

  13. bisot says:

    inspiratif sekali, membuat kamera dari kertas dan buku, karya yang inspiratif :)

  14. Sasha-Shae says:

    You are such an inspiration!! Such amazing work every single time!! I love it!!

  15. Hi Kelli – I am so excited to receive these. I received a tracking order saying the books I ordered were set to ship out soon after Dec 3rd. But I haven’t been able to track on the USPS website as there haven’t been updates. Can you confirm if my order was part of the initial order? I had ordered 15. thank you.

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Kelly! Thank you. I actually threw out that original label and decided to ship yours via priority mail (since you had ordered 15, so: insurance, presumed speed, etc) If it doesn’t arrive tomorrow, let me know and I’ll start doing more detective work! My email is my firstname [at] firstnamelastname dot com

  16. sylva says:

    hi Kelli,
    I’ve just received your camera/book and it really is as awesome as I thought.
    thanks so much!

  17. Hi Kelly i found this project while working on a pinhole camera of my own!
    is great what you achieved, but i have a question

    Does your camera actually work with only paper?
    isn’t there a aluminum or tin foil with the perforation?
    i wonder if it can ve done using paper only

    Best regards from Liechtenstein!

    d.

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Daniel, Thanks. Yes- I was surprised too! All of the instructions to make a pinhole camera recommend metal. But in my tests, the paper-with-a-hole-in-it actually yielded sharper images. Crazy, I know!-K

      • Really, no metal needed? so which one is this whole in the DIY file ? the one in the front lens?
        i feel like it’s quite big for sharp images! :D

        p.s. what is the circle piece with a cross for?

        • Kelli says:

          Hey Daniel,

          So happy to hear you’re making it! (And:Thank you for identifying a problem with the file!) The circle with a cross is—indeed—misleading. That cross does not indicate a cut line, as the template would lead you to believe. The cross marks the point where the pinhole is intended to go. I’ve updated the DIY.pdf file, so re-download it and let me know if it is clear. The circle with a cross in it must be made out of the lightproof black paper, but is glued onto a larger lens structure that helps it stretch out when the book is opened. Holla if you encounter an issue :)

          Kelli

  18. Alejandro says:

    HI Kelli!

    I found this project and i’m placing an order,
    However it wont be here for christmas and
    i’m making it as a present for my son, i will make a
    mockup with the DIY but i have a problem, i don’t know where to
    position the ‘pinhole’, in the very front, or right after the movable shutter

    Could you please clarify this ?

    Best regards from México

    • Kelli says:

      :) Thanks for asking– I’ve updated the DIY.pdf file to show where the pinhole goes (a big OOPS on my part) Hope you guys have fun with it!

      • Faith says:

        Hi Mrs. Kelli, I am making this camera as a senior project for school but I don’t really understand the template. I watched the folding video but it looks like some of cutouts are different, can you help me?

  19. CameraCheck says:

    Hi Kelli

    This is a great creation!
    We’ve dedicated an article to it on our website!
    https://cameracheck.be/camera/dit-boek-is-een-camera/

    Kind regards

    CameraCheck

  20. silvia says:

    OMG…. this is fantastic!
    Want to give it to my husband as birthday present. Do you also ship to Italy and how long does it take?
    I mean, if I pre-order today and you will ship it late Feb, do you think I will be able to receive it in 10-20 days?
    Thanks!!!

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Silvia! Thank you. I think that the best way to do this is… I’m going to let people know that the books are here via social media and my newsletter (promise this isn’t a newsletter-joining ploy! Just an alternative to me individually emailing everyone) When I send out that announcement, email me myfirstname@myfirstnamelastname dot com and remind me of the exact date you need it by. I’ll make sure it will get there in time. Newsletter is tinyletter.com/kellianderson

      • silvia says:

        Awesome! Thanks for the quick answer and for the good news.
        I already subscribed to your newsletter a few hours ago when I left the comment here :-)
        So … Now I’m going to pay and pre-order this amazing camera!
        Thanks thanks thanks Kelli.
        Have a wonderful week!
        Silvia

  21. Tim says:

    Does the camera come with developing fluid and fixer?

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Tim, The book comes with paper negatives, but you must either use traditional photo chemistry or make your own homemade developer (from instant coffee and baking soda) to develop it. There is a recipe on the back of the book. I haven’t been using fixer. I’ve just been photographing the negatives with my iphone before they turn pink and fade away. Anyway, here are all of the instructions from the back of the book, so you can see what is involved:

      instructions

  22. 0000DNASIDHIHR says:

    SUPER NÁPAD

  23. yiyi says:

    hi.I love your products very much, but I can’t buy. Can you help me ?Look forward to your reply, thank you![translation] from Google

  24. AntoineV says:

    Hello Kelli,
    I live in France and I’m going on vacation soon in New York, is there any place where I can buy it ?

  25. arianna says:

    Hi Kelly,

    I received your fab book as a gift last month (I live in Italy) I love it. I tried to take a picture and tried to develope it using household ingredients. It came out allmost all white (or light brown) what could have gone wrong? I followed the exposure time. I waited a while before developing so the paper remained in the book for few days. Could that be it?
    Thank you! Arianna

    • Kelli says:

      Hi Arianna,

      Oh no! That is too bad. A photo with nothing on it is probably underexposed (too little light hitting the paper.) On a cloudless day at noon, you must leave the shutter open for about 10 seconds. But on that same day, the sunset may require an exposure time of a whole minute or two to properly capture the scene. I would try taking a photo on a very bright day first, as a test. Using the iPhone app exposure meter is helpful too- although I’ve found that it underestimates the exposure time needed when it is dark. So “increase your exposure time.” Two other possible issues: 1.) ensure the slick/ sticky feeling side of the paper faces the pinhole 2.) make sure you baked your baking soda (unbaked baking soda has not undergone a necessary chemical change.). Don’t hesitate to write of you have any more issues! I hope you enjoy it!

      Kelli

  26. ANONYM says:

    Nejde mi to. Urobí to len akúsi ciaru.

  27. Gahee Lee says:

    Hello! I am excited to order this pinhole camera pop-up book! This is soooo creative and amazing!

    How long would it take a time to ship this to South Korea?
    And, would you check the shipping fee ?
    I just paid only $29.

    Plz send email to me.
    Thanks.

Trackbacks

Check out what others are saying...
  1. […] di piegatura, il pezzo di carta diventa una macchina fotografica perfettamente funzionante. The Book is a Camera è l’ultima esperienza del pop-up book, un libro che non solo spiega come funzionano le macchine […]

  2. […] saber mais sobre o “This book is a camera”, acesse o site do projeto. O livro pode ser adquirido por 20 […]

  3. […] les dejamos el link en donde pueden encontrar este increíble libro. También échenle un ojo a su blog ya que sube cosas que pueden ser de mucha […]

  4. […] that connects the dots between design and science/structure and function,” Anderson writes. This book does just that — it both explains and demonstrates how a camera uses light to […]

  5. […] The book is a camera è il nome del progetto finale, un libro pop-up che non solo spiega come funziona una macchina fotografica ma la crea fra le sue pagine. Dopo una serie di operazioni che coinvolgono la piegatura dei fogli, il pezzo di carta originale diventa una macchina fotografica perfettamente utilizzabile. […]

  6. […] Kelli Anderson δημιούργησε ένα τέτοιο βιβλίο, το οποίο στο εσωτερικό του κρύβει μία λειτουργική […]

  7. […] Para saber mais sobre a câmera, visite o site de Kelli, clicando aqui. […]

  8. Artel says:

    […] and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully […]

  9. […] 素敵なアイデアカメラをご紹介。アーティストのKelli Andersonさんが創作したカメラ「This Book is a Camera」は本なのですがカメラなのですww […]

  10. […] trata del libro This book is a camera (Este libro es una cámara), de la creativa de la imagen Kelli Anderson, entre sus páginas se encuentran los principios básicos de la fotografía y, tal y como lo indica […]

  11. […] This Book Is a Camera is a pop-up book designed by artist Kelli Anderson that opens up to reveal a working camera. The simple construction works as a pinhole camera with a cardboard shutter that is lifted and replaced to create a timed exposure on photo paper. […]

  12. […] and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully […]

  13. […] and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully […]

  14. […] shine light on the simplicity of creating a pinhole image, artist Kelli Anderson designed This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that contains a real, useable pinhole camera […]

  15. […] di cose” per sé e per gli altri, ha appena “pubblicato” un libro pop-up che si intitola This Book is a Camera e si trasforma in una vera e propria macchina fotografica a foro stenopeico. Perfettamente […]

  16. […] Kelly Anderson művész-dizájner hozta létre ezt a pop-up könyvet, amibe okosan belegyömöszölt egy lyukkamerát. A lyukkamera (ismertebb nevén: camera obscura) egy olyan, lencse nélküli eszköz, ami az elé táruló látvány vizuális leképezését egy aprócska lyukon keresztül ejti meg. Gyakorlatilag ez volt a fényképezőgépek elődje, úgyhogy külön izgalmas látni, hogy valaki ilyen újhullámos módon menti át a működési elvét a 21. század színes-szagos mindennapjaiba. […]

  17. […] shine light on the simplicity of creating a pinhole image, artist Kelli Anderson designed This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that contains a real, useable pinhole camera […]

  18. […] This Book is a Camera, Kelli Anderson a fabriqué un livre popup qui explique à la fois comment un appareil photo marche […]

  19. […] to why she created this little contraption, Anderson says, ‘I wanted to make a working camera within an educational pop-up book—one that connects the […]

  20. […] Kelli Anderson ศิลปินและนักออกแบบ ได้ปล่อยหนังสือเล่มหนึ่งที่ชื่อว่า หนังสือเล่มนี้คือกล้อง […]

  21. […] and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully […]

  22. […] Anderson’s book is nothing more than a super creative pinhole camera, which comes with a kit for you to reveal your images. But the designer also shares on the project’s website a DIY PDF guide with instructions on how you can make one yourself. […]

  23. […] und Designerin Kelli Anderson hat vorgestern ein neues Buch unter dem Titel This Book is a Camera veröffentlicht. Wie der Titel […]

  24. […] Anderson’s book is nothing more than a super creative pinhole camera, which comes with a kit for you to reveal your images. But the designer also shares on the project’s website a DIY PDF guide with instructions on how you can make one yourself. […]

  25. […] to Anderson’s extensive blog post about the project, This Book Is A Camera is part of a series of projects aimed at deconstructing […]

  26. […] เคยเห็นหนังสือที่เปิดมาแล้วเป็นกล้องไหมหละครับ ตัวนี้เป็นกล้องรูเข็มที่น่าใช้มากครับดีไซน์ออกมาเป็นหนังสือหน้าตาสีสันสุดสวย พอเปิดเท่านั้นหละกลายเป็น มี pop up เป็นกล้องเด้งออกมากเลย มาพร้อมกระดาษอัดภาพ Ilford กับถาดน้ำยาล้างภาพ โดยการใช้งานก็ง่ายมากพอเปิดมาแล้วก็ใส่น้ำกระดาษอัดภาพ ไปในด้านหลังของกล้องแต่ขอย้ำนะครับว่ากระดาษโดนแสงไม่ได้เราควรใส่ในที่ที่ไม่มีแสงสว่างเลย พอใส่เสร็จก็ปิดด้านหลังให้แน่น แค่นี้ก็สามารถนำออกไปถ่ายภาพได้แล้วครับ โดยชัตเตอร์จะอยู่ด้านหน้าให้การดึงในการเปิดปิดชัตเตอร์ โดยเป็นผลงานการออกแบบของ kelli anderson ใครอยากได้ลองดู kellianderson […]

  27. […] se enfoca en buscar nuevas maneras de crear imágenes y experiencias. Con el proyecto “Este libro es una cámara”, Anderson logró sacar provecho de las propiedades de la luz para producir imágenes por medio […]

  28. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  29. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  30. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  31. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  32. […] Kelli Anderson creó algo increíble cuando diseñó este libro es una cámara.  Sí, es un libro Camara… pero el título no está mintiendo. Es una cámara, también. El […]

  33. […] couple of days ago, artist and designer Kelli Anderson published a new book titled This Book is a Camera. As the title suggests it’s a pop-up book […]

  34. […] and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully […]

  35. […] is a Camera, is a pop-up book that turns into a functioning pinhole camera. Designed by artist Kelli Anderson the book comes with B/W Ilford photo paper. What is most ingenious is that the body of the camera […]

  36. […] here’s an idea: offer them artist and designer Kelli Anderson‘s latest book, This Book is a Camera. The pop-up book explains, and ultimately demonstrates, “how a structure as humble as a […]

  37. […] A This book is a camera névre keresztelt projekt lényege, hogy az alkotó az Adobe Creative Residency segítségével megalkotott egy olyan könyvet, amely elmondása szerint a vágások és hajtások megfelelő sorozatát követően képes arra, hogy demonstrálja; hogy képes egy olyan egyszerű tárgy, mint egy darabka hajtott-vágott papír a fény és az általa hordozott emlékek megszelídítésére és befogására. Hát így. A könyv az útmutatót is tartalmazza, de még érdekesebbek ha megnézitek a projekt blog oldalát, ahol a hogyan részletesebben is kifejtésre kerül, valamint találhattok használati útmutatót. […]

  38. […] propositions récentes jouent avec la forme des livres. This Book is a Camera est une proposition de Kelli Anderson. Comme le nom indique le livre non seulement traite des […]

  39. […] Artist and designer Kelli Anderson has created a pop-up book that turns into a working 4×5 camera with a few cuts and folds of the paper. On her blog, Anderson explains: […]

  40. […] Artist and designer Kelli Anderson has created a pop-up book that turns into a working 4×5 camera with a few cuts and folds of the paper. On her blog, Anderson explains: […]

  41. […] Artist and designer Kelli Anderson has created a pop-up book that turns into a working 4×5 camera with a few cuts and folds of the paper. On her blog, Anderson explains: […]

  42. […] e designer Kelli Anderson ha appena pubblicato il suo ultimo libro This Book is a Camera (“Questo libro è una […]

  43. […] แล้ว Anderson เธอได้กระซิบบอกว่า… จริงๆแล้วเจ้าสมุดเล่มนี่มันสามารถทำได้ง่ายมากๆถึงขนาดที่คุณเองก็สามารถประดิษฐ์มันขึ้นมาใช้ได้เอง แต่ถึงแม้มันจะใช้งานง่ายมากๆ ก็ตาม ยังไงคุณก็ยังต้องใช้ developer fluid และก็ต้องมีห้องมืดเพื่อใช้สำหรับล้างฟิลม์ด้วย ใครสนใจวิธีการประดิษฐ์และวิธีการทำงานของกล้องรูเข็ม ก็ลองไปอ่านข้อมูลเพิ่มเติม(ภาษาอังกฤษ)ได้ที่บล็อคของศิลปินได้เลย […]

  44. […] przekonać się, jak to możliwe, że papierowa książka robi zdjęcia. Na swojej stronie autorka udostępnia szablon oraz instrukcję, jak własnoręcznie wykonać podobny […]

  45. […] The project is one more of Anderson’s foray into deconstructing technology, and making it both understandable and relatable in the digital world: […]

  46. […] available for $29 on her website. If you like do-it-yourself projects, Anderson has also generously made her camera’s design available for free as a PDF under a Creative Commons […]

  47. […] sekrety fotografii analogowej, może wejść na oficjalną stronę internetową Kelli Andersen (http://kellianderson.com/blog/2015/11/the-book-is-a-camera-really/#superdiy). Tam artystka zamieściła filmy DIY, dzięki którym taki aparat można zrobić samemu w domowych […]

  48. […] tekijä on laittanut myös tarkat ohjeet miten kameraa käytetään ja miksi se toimii omille […]

  49. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  50. […] j’avais envie de vous présenter un très joli et poétique objet designé par Kelli Anderson : le livre This Book is a Camera. Ce livre concept vous expliquera le principe de […]

  51. […] this educational book slash pinhole camera by designer and artist Kelli Anderson, for example. Kelli’s figured out a sequence of cuts and […]

  52. […] That is the basic point behind Kalli Anderson’s book, This Book is A Camera. She explains it on her blog: […]

  53. […] el proyecto denominado The Book is a Camera (Este libro es una cámara) del artista y diseñador Kelli Anderson nacido en New […]

  54. […] projeto da designer se chama This Book is a Camera, e evidencia o quanto a sequência certa de cortes e dobraduras pode transformar um simples pedaço […]

  55. […] centers on photography, graphic design, typography, illustration or video. Take a look atBecky and Kelli’s projects (and check out their blog posts) to get an idea of what the residency is like. You’ll spend your […]

  56. […] on photography, graphic design, typography, illustration or video. Take a look atBecky and Kelli’s projects (and check out their blog posts) to get an idea of what the residency is like. You’ll spend […]

  57. […] For example: This Book is a Camera:  http://kellianderson.com/blog/2015/11/the-book-is-a-camera-really/ […]

  58. […] This Book is a Camera este un instrument educational care explica modul in care fotografia functiona inainte sa avem telefoane cu camera. In plus, cartea contine un kit pentru incepatori: aparatul functional de tip pinhole care apare in momentul in care deschizi cartea, hartie foto Ilford alb-negru si instructiuni de folosire si intelegere a tehnicii pinhole. […]

  59. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  60. […] If you’ve ever wanted a book that turns in to a camera, check this one out by Kelli Anderson.  It’s a popup book that turns in to a real, working […]

  61. […] Anderson’s book is nothing more than a super creative pinhole camera, which comes with a kit for you to reveal your images. But the designer also shares on the project’s website a DIY PDF guide with instructions on how you can make one yourself. […]

  62. […] Anderson’s book is nothing more than a super creative pinhole camera, which comes with a kit for you to reveal your images. But the designer also shares on the project’s website a DIY PDF guide with instructions on how you can make one yourself. […]

  63. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  64. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  65. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  66. […] di piegatura, il pezzo di carta diventa una macchina fotografica perfettamente funzionante. The Book is a Camera è l’ultima esperienza del pop-up book, un libro che non solo spiega come funzionano le macchine […]

  67. […] Kelli Anderson created something amazing when she designed This Book Is a Camera. Yes, it is a pop-up book…but the title isn’t lying. It’s a camera, too. The book […]

  68. […] dólares en un pack que además incluye cinco hojas de papel fotográfico. Como si esto fuera poco, podés descargar de manera gratuita y en formato PDF la plantilla con la que lo ha […]



Leave A Comment